Orbit [Eye Socket]

Orbital Trauma

In the United States, injuries to the eyes and eye socket are unfortunately common place. Eyelid laceration, tear drain injuries, bleeding within and bruising around the eye, and fractures of the bones of the eye socket can all occur. These injuries often occur from sporting activities like baseball, soccer or football. In addition car accidents, fist fights, and dog bites are other common causes. Trauma to the orbit and eye area most often results in bruising, eyelid lacerations, and fractures of the orbital bone Since the bones of the eye socket done move like your arm or leg, they don’t all need to be fixed. Fractures causing double vision or large fractures into the sinus should typically be repaired in a timely fashion. Sometimes this is not possible but late repairs, despite being more difficult, can still be done.

Sometimes trauma is severe enough to irreparably injure the eye. Along with diseased eyes that are blind, painful and disfiguring, the removal of an eye (enucleation) is indicated when the eye can not be salvaged. Reconstruction of the eye socket, followed by fabrication of a prosthetic eye (performed by an ocularist), typically leads to a very pleasing result. Regular examinations are required as occasionally further reconstruction may be needed to retain proper fit of an eye prosthesis.

Orbital Tumors & Infections

Orbital infection, or Orbital cellulitis, is an aggressive sight, and even life, threatening process. Usually arising secondarily from an adjacent sinus infection, this situation must be treated swiftly and aggressively with antibiotics and often surgery. Close follow up and monitoring is required to treat these infections, but is typically successful. Of note, not all infections occur as an extension of sinusitis. This can also occur after trauma to the eyelid, eye or orbit as well as in patients whose immune system is challenged.

In both children and adults, a variety of tumors can occur in the eye socket. Some grow slowly, and go unnoticed while others can grow rapidly; impairing vision and causing even greater problems. CT scans and MRI’s are the best method for detecting and differentiating these lesions prior to having surgery. Once the location is identified, along with the general characteristics of the lesion, a treatment plan can be created. In some instances your orbital surgeon can treat these tumors on their own, often as an outpatient. On the other hand, aggressive tumors may require the help of other surgical specialist and in patient hospital treatment.

Why should you see Dr. Amadi for your Orbital Disease?

The orbit is a small, compact and complex structure. Oculo-Facial surgeons have undertaken the extra training to deal with the nuances of treating orbital disease and injuries. When choosing a surgeon to evaluate and treat your orbital problem, look for an Ophthalmic Facial plastic & reconstructive surgeon who specializes in the eyelid, orbit, and tear drain surgery. Dr. Amadi is a member of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) and has extensive training required to care for these problems in children and adults. Membership in ASOPRS indicates your surgeon is not only a board certified ophthalmologist who knows the anatomy and structure of the eye and orbit, but also has expertise in ophthalmic plastic reconstructive Surgery to appropriately care for your problem.


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